Get to know the Presser Feet

 

The function of the sewing machine foot is to apply pressure on the fabric, keeping it from moving while it is being sewn. The foot should set down flat on the fabric. There are many types of feet; each one has a specific function to sew a particular kind of material in the best and easiest method possible. You can find a few feet that look different but do the same job. Every foot has two distinct characteristics, the material it is constructed from and the method used when attaching the individual foot to the sewing machine.

The presser foot is typically made of transparent plastic or metal or a combination of the two. The advantage of the foot being transparent is that the stitch can be seen under the foot. 

Get to know the Presser Feet

 

The function of the sewing machine foot is to apply pressure on the fabric, keeping it from moving while it is being sewn. The foot should set down flat on the fabric. There are many types of feet; each one has a specific function to sew a particular kind of material in the best and easiest method possible. You can find a few feet that look different but do the same job. Every foot has two distinct characteristics, the material it is constructed from and the method used when attaching the individual foot to the sewing machine.

The presser foot is typically made of transparent plastic or metal or a combination of the two. The advantage of the foot being transparent is that the stitch can be seen under the foot. 

Attaching the foot

 

The method of attaching the foot to the machine depends on the type of sewing machine being used. There are 2 ways to attach the foot, snap on or screw on.  Most of the sewing machines manufactured after 1980, have the “snap on.” Attaching the foot is simple requiring only pressing the button behind the presser foot, to put on the foot or to take it off.

The screw method is used most often on sewing machines manufactured before 1980. It is a system that measures the gap from the bottom of the foot’s surface to the center of the screw slot. In this system you press the presser foot down and measure the distance for low shank: 0.5 inch, high shank is 1 inch, slant shank (Singer sewing machine) is 1 inch, here the leg has slant. Changing the feet is a simple process done by taking out the screw, putting the foot in place and then turning the screw back tightly. There are sewing machines that can use either snap on, or the screw method for the foot attachment as the machine has both.

Standard presser foot

 

Standard Presser Foot / General Foot  

This is the basic foot. It is a standard foot for sewing just about any material when no special technique is necessary.  It is used to sew a straight or a zigzag stitch. It has a wide opening for the needle to permit sewing wide stitches. The foot sits flat with even pressure on the fabric beneath it.

 

Walking foot

 

 Walking Foot / Even Feed Foot / Dual Feed Foot

When sewing, the foot sits on top of the fabric. The feeding system of the sewing machine feeds the fabric through. When sewing two layers or more, the foot sits on the upper layer of material. The feeding system of the sewing machine feeds the lower layer through, so the layers do not move at the same rate. You will see at the end of the stitching one piece of material appears to have become a centimetre or two longer than the other. The walking foot walks over the upper layer and has it’s own feeding system which works respectively with the sewing machine’s feeding system. In this way the upper and the lower layer of the material will move together at the same rate, so the layers will be sewn accurately.

When to use the walking foot? When sewing quilted material because there are several layers (an upper layer, filling and lower layer). When sewing slippery fabrics such as satin, velvet, etc. When sewing satin ribbons to garments: the walking foot will hold it together so the ribbon will not slip and will not need as many pins to hold it in position.

 

Zipper Foot

Zipper Foot

Since the coil of the zipper creates a bump along its length, it is hard to sew it with a standard foot. The standard foot can’t sit steady on the fabric and can’t sew it closely along the coil of the zipper. However, with the zipper foot, the machine can sew the zipper on both sides of the coil without sitting astride it. The zipper foot can also be used to sew small things like piping or cording. This special foot can be mounted on either side so that the left or the right of the zipper’s coil can be sewn.

The structure of the zipper foot: the underside of the foot is narrow to allow the coil of the zipper to feed trough smoothly. The foot will sit flat on the fabric next to the zipper coil. This foot helps eliminate skipped stitches when sewing in zippers. There is another type of zipper foot for sewing thick zippers. This foot is narrower so it will not touch the coil of the thick zipper when sewing it.

 

Buttonhole Foot

Buttonhole Foot

This foot is used to stitch a buttonhole that matches the size of the intended button. In order to use this foot, the sewing machine needs to have a buttonhole lever that must be pulled down and positioned on the foot. The buttonhole lever is positioned in the "gap". Once sewing (of the buttonhole) is completed, the sewing machine automatically stops.

Buttonhole Foot

The size of the “gap” must match the width of the button, so that the buttonhole will accommodate the size of the button.

 Buttonhole Foot

There are two options to choose from: narrow buttonhole or a wide buttonhole. The old sewing machines sew the parts of the buttonhole separately and the machine must be directed.  The newer sewing machines will sew the entire buttonhole at one time. It just requires pressing the machine pedal with your foot until it stops automatically.  Using this adaptation is simple: mark on the fabric the buttonhole's length. Place the button on the button guide plate and set the plate to the right length, so the button will not move. Select the right stitch. Pull down buttonhole lever. Start sewing the buttonhole. When completing sewing the buttonhole, don’t forget to put the buttonhole lever back in place otherwise the sewing machine will not function. After the buttonhole is stitched, a cut must be made in the middle of it with a seam ripper.

 

Free Motion Foot / Darning Foot

Free Motion Foot / Darning Foot

This foot has several different names, free motion and darning foot.  It is designed to allow the fabric to be manipulated anyway chosen without the rejection of the sewing machine. When the general presser foot is used, the feeding system of the sewing machine feeds the fabric through. Whenever we use the free motion presser foot, we need to neutralize the feeding function. We exclude or cover the feeding dogs (If this is not possible, adjust the stitch length of your machine to zero or as low as your machine will allow), and attach the free motion foot.

Cover for feeding dogs: Free Motion Foot / Darning Foot

This foot doesn't sit on the fabric and doesn't touch it most of the time (only when the needle is in the fabric). The machine operator now moves the fabric to “draw” a design made of stitches. The size of the stitch is determined by the speed that the fabric is moved and the pressure applied to the foot pedal. It may seem difficult at first, but some practice may help to get consistent stitches. To succeed at doing this machine embroidery, consistent speed when moving the fabric and pressing the pedal is necessary. Attaching the foot to your sewing machine is done from the rear of the needle bar. Releasing the foot drop lever is an important thing to remember since the foot does not sit on the fabric it is easy to forget.  When the foot is dropped tension is created on the upper thread so that it doesn’t tangle. Most of the darning feet will have a “C” or “O” shape having either metal or clear plastic at the base.

 

Quilting Foot / Patchwork Foot

plastic at the base.

When quilting, a quarter inch for the seam allowance is required. If using the quilting foot, the edge of the fabric is placed next to the edge of the foot. The length from the edge of the foot to the needle is exactly a quarter inch. This foot doesn’t have the option to sew any other stitch but the straight stitch.

 

Button Foot

Button Foot

The button foot is an accessory used to sew on buttons with a sewing machine.  There are many types of the button foot. The underside of the foot is covered with silicone to hold the button, so it won’t move. Sewing on buttons can also be done with a standard foot. In this case (sewing with standard foot) it will be harder to adjust the needle to fit in the button’s holes (because the standard presser foot is made out of metal and can’t hold the button in place very well). The button foot is small and transparent; it helps to see the button and exactly where to sew. When sewing with this foot, a button-sew-on-stitch is needed. To begin sewing on the button, lower the foot down on the button so that the two buttonholes are positioned in the cut out of the presser foot needle’s opening. Make sure that the needle enters the left hole, then sew until the machine stops automatically. If a button-sew-on-stitch can’t be used, then use a zigzag stitch and sew around the button.

 

Satin Stitch Foot

satin Stitch Foot

This foot is for sewing decorative stitches such as a dense zigzag stitch.  The structure of the foot viewed from above looks like a standard foot. The underside of this foot has room to allow sewing over the thickness of the stitches and even feeds the fabric through. It is also see- through so you can easily see where the sewing machine needle is going while sewing.

 

Overlock Foot

Overlock Foot

The overlock foot is used to make an overlock stitch useful for finishing the edge of a sewing project to prevent the fabric from unravelling. There are serger machines that sew the overlock stitch and encloses the seam allowance of the fabric (with a built in knife), all in one step. An overlock stitch looks like two straight lines and a zigzag stitch between them. When doing this stitch with a home sewing machine, sew the stitch at the edge of the fabric, since the home sewing machine does not have the knife to cut the edge and encloses it. The overlock foot is the home sewing machine’s answer to providing stitches like a serger. On the overlock foot there is a little brush to clean the fibers and pieces of fabric away. The foot has two little poles to make the stitch straight and flat.

overlock stitch: Overlock Foot      overlock stitch on edge of fabric:  Overlock Foot

 

 

  
  CIRCLE SKIRT SEWING PATTERNCIRCLE SKIRT SEWING PATTERNCIRCLE SKIRT SEWING PATTERNThere are a few types of circle skirts: Light circle skirt, Half circle skirt and a Full circle skirt. Read more...            
Copyright 2017 - www.sewing-patterns.org